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A guide to the Baltic 99 questionnaire for the dry bulk shipping industry

A step-by-step guide to the Baltic 99 questionnaire

Chapter 5: Speed, consumption & fuel engine

This segment of the Baltic Questionnaire is very important for vessels chartered out on period time charter. Since the speed and consumption figures are also included in a relevant clause of the charter party, you must make sure that there is consistency between the contractual warranties and the figures mentioned in the questionnaire.

4.1. SPEED AND CONSUMPTION FIGURES:

The speed and consumption of the laden and the ballast legs are inserted here. Make sure you use the word “about” in front of both the speed and the consumption. These figures can be found in the t/c description of the vessel and in case same is not available the operations/technical department and/or the vessel’s Master should declare same basis the actual performance of the vessel during the last months.

4.2. BUNKER GRADES:

There are various bunker grades that the ship’s engine can consume. For example, a vessel may need IFO 380 CST, while another vessel may burn IFO 180 CST or other vessels may require MGO. You will find this information in the Engine’s Makers Manual. Since this manual is not readily available to everyone, the technical department or the Master can advise in case needed.

4.3. PERMANENT BUNKER CAPACITIES (EXCLUDING UNPUMPABLES WHICH ARE ……………………. METRIC TONS) BASIS ……. PCT CAPACITY:

The bunkers are placed in dedicated tanks and their volume is described in the capacity plan, usually basis 98% capacity to avoid any tank over-flow. From this total capacity, the unpumpable quantities must be deducted and this should be advised by the vessel’s master.

4.4. PORT CONSUMPTION PER 24 HOURS IDLE/WORKING (METRIC TONS):

When the vessel is at port, only the auxiliary engines consume bunkers. If the vessel is idle only one auxiliary engine is working while when the vessel is working (i.e. loading-discharge with cranes, ballast/deballast etc), more auxiliary engines will be running and therefore the consumption in this case is higher.
Both the idle and working consumptions are required here. The figures inserted should be the same with the ones in the t/c description to avoid any discrepancy.

Therefore, the figures can be found either in the t/c description or (if unavailable) to be provided by the Master or the technical department (in case of Newbuild).

4.5 ENGINE MAKE AND TYPE:

The maker of the main engine and its type can be found in the Certificate of Registry.

4.6 MAX OUTPUT BHP/RPM:

BHP or Brake Horsepower (BHP) is the measure of an engine’s horsepower (HP) before the losses in the transmission. Revolutions per minute (RPM) is a measure of the number of times the Crankshaft rotates around its axis.

Both the BHP and RPM are used to evaluate the main engine’s strength and it can be found in the engine specification. Sometimes, Charterers also require the engine’s BHP and RPM at a lower output which is called NCR (Nominal Continuous Rating) instead of the MCR (Maximum Continuous Rating) as usually called the Max output of the vessel.

Keeping track of your B99 questionnaires with Shipamax

Keeping track of the latest B99 questionnaires can be time consuming. Shipamax offers an electronic version of the Baltic 99 questionnaire as part of our team workspace for operators. If you already keep this information in online format, speak to us to understand how we can automatically sync this with our intelligent layer for dry bulk shipping operators.

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